Buxus Study No. 2.
This image needs a bit of explanation. (reason being, some thought I had Photoshoped it)
These are leaves from a Buxus plant. They are about 2 centimetres long. I started playing around with them in the studio using 6 leaves, then 10, and then more. It grew from there. (pardon the pun). After a few attempts I found that they formed this swirling pattern, even though as I put each one down there was no predetermined pattern I was after. (many people have commented that it look like an Aboriginal painting). I spent a full day laboriously doing an arrangement and then left it overnight to photograph in the morning. When I came back the next day all the leaves had curled and dried out. Started again. Pick more leaves, sort through them, start arranging again. After a couple of goes I was finally able to capture this final image.
The leaves were laid on a sheet of glass and lit with studio flash and shoot on 5 by 4 Velvia sheet film then scanned. The final print is 120 cm on the long side. 

Buxus Study No. 2.

This image needs a bit of explanation. (reason being, some thought I had Photoshoped it)

These are leaves from a Buxus plant. They are about 2 centimetres long. I started playing around with them in the studio using 6 leaves, then 10, and then more. It grew from there. (pardon the pun). After a few attempts I found that they formed this swirling pattern, even though as I put each one down there was no predetermined pattern I was after. (many people have commented that it look like an Aboriginal painting). I spent a full day laboriously doing an arrangement and then left it overnight to photograph in the morning. When I came back the next day all the leaves had curled and dried out. Started again. Pick more leaves, sort through them, start arranging again. After a couple of goes I was finally able to capture this final image.

The leaves were laid on a sheet of glass and lit with studio flash and shoot on 5 by 4 Velvia sheet film then scanned. The final print is 120 cm on the long side.